What part does design management play in manufacturing?

 

Products are created as unique pieces, thought and designed by resourceful inventors, who, called designers or manufacturers, show their product in the business world, in turn emulating businessmen.

There are many levels a businessman can achieve, but all these levels have the purpose of selling a product.

This is a pitch in which design management plays an important role, a role in which can be everything but unimportant, from a manufactured chair to an industrial production television.

If we think about it, it is not that easy to link manufacturing and management together. However, in order to understand this relationship, it is important to look back in the early 1990s when ‘the Schools of Art and universities gave birth to what was perceived as … “the designer maker” [who] placed the craftsperson into a marketplace to which trend forecasters, interior stylists and lifestyle editors turned to source the latest design.’ (Tanner, 2010).

 

Craft has always been linked to high quality products, well designed and produced with fine materials, but with no doubt lasting good looking products noxious for he wallet.

After the Industrial Revolution, the mass production of goods by large-scale industry reduced crafts role in the market place, since it was possible to buy goods that resembled the ‘handcrafted quality level’ but at cheaper prices.

Excluding this, craft has always maintained an important role in the sector, because of the craft enthusiasts who never gave up the pleasure of the unique and bespoke of the true quality, and realised its potential for making unique and individual products.

Obliquity-Chair_Enda-Scott_RDS2014

As Tanner also states:

‘Craft not only responds to our industrial heritage and historic foundations but evidently sets pace for new material experimentations [moreover] the maker is able to research manufacturing over the internet and find ethical, traditional and sustainable processes of manufacture, so creating a bond among craft, design and manufacture.’ (2010).

Within an organization, no matter its size, ‘design can affect management on many different levels … [being] the development process and the implementation of projects, systems and services.’ (Best, 2006).

A chair, for example, even if beautifully designed and handmade, has to be identified, and valorised starting from its function and its qualities; it needs to be illustrated to the customer, who has to get carried away by the experience the product offers.

So every product needs a strategic plan, that can increase sales and the notoriety of the brand or maker it represents.

In this case design acts as a showcase, as a tool that works both from the outside (sales agreement) and the inside (product development); it is both the technique and financial plan, that gives extent to the product, putting it well packaged in the hands of the customer.

 

 

 

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Within an organization, small or big it is, design (Best, 2006) can affect management on many different levels … [being] the development process and the implementation of projects, systems and services.3

A chair, even if beautifully designed and handmade, has to be identified, and valorized starting from its function and its qualities; it needs to be illustrated to the customer, who has to get carried away by the experience the product offers.

So even a chair needs a strategic plan, that can increase sales and the notoriety of its brand/maker.

In this case design acts as a showcase, as a tool that works both from the outside (sales agreement) and the inside (product development); it is both the technique and financial plan, that gives extent to the product, putting it well packaged in the hands of the customer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

  1. Best, K. (2006). Design management. Lausanne, Switzerland: AVA Academia.
  2. Tanner, A. (2010). Batch. London: A & C Black Publishers.

 

IMAGES

 

  1. http://design-management.commonclass.org/post/31138633543/class-1-introduction-to-design-management (Accessed: 08/02/2016)
  2. http://www.dccoi.ie/about/blog/rds-national-craft-awards-2014 (Accessed: 08/02/2016)
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